Simple Money-Saving Tips To Get You Through Even The Hardest Months

Yeah, yeah, you probably should’ve eased up on the spending during the silly season. But the past is past, and it’s what you do now that matters, right? Right. So we have good news: there are easy ways to save money — and (mega bonus) each of the below money-saving tips helps to save the planet at the same time. 

Save cash… and the planet

Double up your New Year’s resolutions from just saving cash, to saving the planet too. Here, our fresh take on money-saving tips and smart ways to be more eco-conscious.

Make 2020 the year of the reusable bag

We can’t avoid having to buy groceries. And not only does that 60c you pay for your plastic bag add up over time, but it’s plastic guys. Let “I’ll pop by the shop on my way home” be a thing of the past. Rather plan your trip to the grocery store and be prepared with a list and shopping bag in hand.

Most major food retailers sell reusable bags at a decent price. Some have even introduced biodegradable brown paper bags as an alternative. There are options and all it takes a slight shift in perspective to fully embrace the trend. It’s a super-easy money-saving tip that anyone can achieve.

READ MORE: 5 Mistakes Almost Everyone Makes When They Start New Year’s Resolution Diets

Try long-use hair removal methods

Another cool way to save money while being eco-conscious: alternative hair removal methods. Items like handheld laser tools have reached SA shores, along with the hair removal crystal, which literally wipes hair away. They’re super durable, easy to clean (and use) and great value for your money — because they actually last. This is a great beginner step towards zero-waste living and an eco-conscious bathroom. And it means you literally get to start off your year on a “clean slate” (had to).

Buy Bleame here.

Switch to a menstrual cup

Faithful to Nature Regular Goddess Menstrual Cup

Part of the reason for climate change is the immense amount of waste we generate. Chief among the culprits? Sanitary towels — a monthly expense for all of us, and one many young girls in SA struggle to access. According to Menstrual Health Alliance India, one pad could take from 500 to 800 years to decompose since the material is not biodegradeable. 

Enter the new wave of menstrual cups and their associated benefits: they’re a cost-effective, non-harmful and environmentally friendly. Get this: a single cup can last you for up to five years! [FYI — I tried the Faithful to Nature Regular Goddess Menstrual Cup cup in size small and it’s super easy to use, comfortable and odourless.] Making this small change can make a huge difference in your monthly spending. And you can use the savings to donate cups to other girls in need. Plus, you can buy menstrual cups at pharmacies now, making them easier than ever to access. Win-win. 

READ MORE: This 17-Day Slimdown Plan Will Help Get You Back In Shape

Become a hoarder — the higher-level kind

I found a clever way to prolong the life of a used room spray bottle. By refilling it with water, I could spray my indoor plants (think convenience and glam!). I even used it on my face and it was magical — instant hydration. By keeping the gift useful, my plant is thriving and my face gets its glow at no extra cost.

Faithful to Nature Insulated Coffee Cup

And there’s more… Store a travel mug in your car and get your coffee at a discount at participating coffee shops. Get this cup from Faithful To Nature.

READ MORE: 15 Best Journalling Apps To Start The New Year With More Mindfulness

Stop the drip

Now, I love a good long shower or even a bubble bath (did I say that out loud?) as much as the next girl… But all that liquid goodness can really drag down those units on the meter. Though we narrowly escaped #DayZero in the Western Cape, water is still an issue. It’s a stark reality for many in parts of the country. Being water-wise is an ongoing initiative and it’s important to keep up those habits we formed during the height of the crisis — to prevent another one.

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